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Archive for February, 2013

peer pressure

I think An of StraightGrain said it best with this: I couldn’t resist The Power Of The Geranium Dress. How true, how true.

geranium-1895

It was only a matter of time before I made one for Lila, and Robin and Kristin kindly expedited my plans by informing me on Friday afternoon that both of their lovely daughters would be wearing Geraniums to our Saturday lunch date, and wouldn’t I like to join in on that photo op? A little more notice woulda been nice, ladies! Just kidding, I’m always up for a friendly sewing challenge.

geranium-1903

This wasn’t the fabric I had envisioned for my first Geranium dress, but given the time constraints I ended up having to pick something from my stash. Though not before driving in Friday rush hour traffic with two disgruntled children to the fabric store looking for exactly what I wanted, and then to a second fabric store later that evening, both times to no avail. But I had 1.5 yards of this Amy Butler print on my shelf, and it’d been sitting there for a year, which is probably long enough. So I settled for that. The print is maybe a little bold/loud/large for the dress, but I’m happy enough with it overall. Or maybe I was just happy to finish it on time?

geranium-1907I went with the pleated, side-seam pockets version and left the neckline intact, mostly because I was working against the clock, but also to preserve the big red flower centered on the bodice.

geranium-1884

After completing my first Geranium dress I can assure you that the pattern lives up to the hype – besides just yielding an adorable dress, it’s really well written, there are lots of fun mix-and-match options, and the fit is great. This is a 4T, and while Lila will in fact be four next month and it’s totally cliche to say, I am still in utter disbelief I’m sewing anything for this girl in a size 4….

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felt & valentines

Happy February! Today I’m re-posting the Valentines I shared at Clever Charlotte last year. If you’d like to learn how to make some mini felt Valentine envelopes, read on….

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Hello Clever Charlotte readers!

I’m Gail from probably actually, and I’m happy to be here to share a wool creation for the Winter Wolle series! I love to make things for my daughter, and a few of my favorite past projects have been made from wool or wool felt. There’s something so satisfying about working with wool, and I especially love felt – it has such a nice texture, and cutting and sewing with it is always such a pleasure. For me, felt and Valentines go hand in hand (I cut out loads of felt hearts for a garland last year), so I made tiny felt Valentine envelopes to house some mini Valentines.

My mom and sisters and I have a tradition of exchanging valentines, so these are for them (and one for Lila, of course).

The envelopes were cut using a Paper Source “baby” envelope template – the finished size is 2 1/8 by 3 1/2 inches (the size of a business card). Before sewing them together I added a little felt heart in the stamp corner and an “address label” that I rubber stamped on twill tape. If you crease the envelope flaps with a hot iron it leaves you with a nice rectangle on the front, making it easy to get these additions in the right place before the whole thing is assembled.

I secured everything with a running stitch using embroidery floss. Whenever I can get away with it I sew stuff by machine, but working with felt is the one time I actually prefer hand-stitching, and the embroidery floss can add a nice pop of color.

The envelopes close with two little buttons. After sewing the button to the top flap, I pulled the thread (I used embroidery floss here, too) to the inside and left it about six inches long – that remaining length of thread is used to secure the envelope shut with the bottom button, manila envelope style.

Tucked inside are little Valentines – just a felt heart stitched on by hand and a stamped message.

There you have it. Thanks so much for having me, and happy Valentine’s Day everyone!

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